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MIKE RINDER ASSAULTED MY MOTHER, PERMANENTLY DISABLING HER: In 2010, my “father” grabbed my mom’s arms, crushing and twisting them so hard that she sustained lacerations, bruises, nerve damage, and a shoulder injury.

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I was mortified when my “father,” Mike Rinder, brought the death of my sister, Kimberley, into his bigoted comments in responding to a woman’s loss of her son. And worst of all, he tried to monetize the deaths, using them as a sales pitch for his own “story.” I’m not exaggerating.

He has never spoken to me about my sister before—not once in my life. I was four years old when it happened, but I remember it—all of a sudden my baby sister was gone. I also remember that my mom was devastated. And I remember that my father didn’t really seem to care. In fact, he was quite cruel to my mother.


My mom recently told me a story that exemplifies this. Days after the death of my sister, my mom asked Mike to develop some photos she had taken of Kimberley. These were the few mementos she would have to remember her short life by. Mike took the film, seemingly to develop it, but came back empty-handed. He told my mom that the photos all came out black, so he threw them out. She didn’t believe him and demanded he produce the photos. His response, “It’s better this way,” essentially telling her to “get over it.” Heartless.


Now that I am a grown woman myself, I empathize even more with my mom and how she must have felt to lose a child.


That Mike Rinder so discourteously uses the loss of another woman’s child and my mom’s loss of a baby in the way that he has shows, once again, the type of man that he is. He is a cruel, cold person who does not respect women—or anyone for that matter. He continues to prove this over and over.


Taryn, Justice4Mom

Our country (America) was founded on ideals of freedom, justice, and liberty.

When we first think of the Fourth of July (which has been a federal holiday since 1941), usually it is of burgers sizzling on the grill, fireworks, sparklers, and summer! While these fun and festive traditions are certainly part of this major American holiday, it is also important to reflect and recognize that one has to take action to ensure these freedoms continue to exist, that justice is fair and equal, and that our liberty is kept intact.


And today, fighting for the rights our founders intended each citizen to have has become more important than ever.

But one freedom you may not think about is freedom from violence. Any act of domestic violence is the opposite of the ideals that make our country what it is. Domestic violence and perpetrators of it, are the antithesis of freedom, justice, and liberty. Each act of domestic violence, small or large, takes away that bit of freedom from its victim.


In the celebration of this July 4th weekend, think about anything you may be able to do to take action against domestic violence. Reflect on the year to come – is there anything more you can do to help another, to help a domestic violence victim, a mother, or a child? Each action we take does make a difference.


Enjoy your Independence Day weekend!



Nothing can replace the love between a father and their children. When it is present—it is priceless. Take the time this weekend to strengthen this bond with your father. Cherish him; don’t take that kind, supportive, loving father for granted.


Support strong family relationships and homes free of domestic violence and hate. A strong father-child relationship is important to the growth and well-being of children.


Let’s appreciate and celebrate the fabulous men in every country who are true fathers. A father’s unconditional love outshines any other quality.


After decades of showing no love to my brother or me, my father, Mike Rinder, walked out on his whole family, then attacked and continued to harass each of us. So it is important for me to encourage fathers to NOT be like my father—instead, show your children love, support them, and encourage them. To do otherwise can have a lasting negative effect on those who are our future.


From a daughter with no dad to celebrate today, my message is to be the best dad you can be. Love your children and the women who bore your children. At the very least, don’t harm them, attack them, harass them and victim shame them.